Piece Partners Perth

This page shows the quilts made by Piece Partners of Perth for the project, and song verses made by Christine and Ewan. 

The quilts will be exhibited in Errol, St Madoes and elsewhere.

AN INTRODUCTION

Tune : Can Ye Sew Cushions

Tak up yer needles, yer patches an pins

Scissors an markers, yer wark tae begin

Cross stitch or needlepoint, which one tae start?

Place yer patch carefully, pause, then make art



HERON

FISHING ON THE TAY, BY MORAG AITKEN

Anglers have fished on the River Tay for centuries, competing for the catch with all the bird life that inhabits its banks. I like to inject a bit of fun into my blocks, hence the name and content.

The block was machine pierced and hand quilted. Heat “n” Bond was used to attach the heron and plants.


THE POW BURN AND TOWN LADE, BY ESTHER AITKEN

The Pow Burn was made in the 14th Century to feed the Lade which in turn powered the mills in Perth. The Lade also formed a defensive moat around the town before going into the Tay.

My quilt shows the Burn in the Middle Ages with Perth and the Tay in the background. The lade runs across the left hand side of the picture which also includes the Huntingtower.

I have tried to make my quilt look like a medieval picture. The background fabric resembles old parchment. I have hand appliquéd and quilted the piece and finished off the small details with embroidery.












DUTCH DYKE BUILDERS ON THE RIVER TAY, BY NORMA HILL

Dutch dykers were employed in the Carse of Gowrie in the 1800s to reclaim land from the flood plains of the River Tay. They used straw, ropes and wooden poles in their work. The reclaimed land proved to be very fertile and is idea for growing a variety of fruits, especially apples and raspberries which are used nowadays in local wine making and jam production.

  • Landscape quilt with both machine and hand quilting
  • Bondaweb used for the men and the boat, edged with blanket stitch
  • Wool used to represent straw used in the land reclamation work
  • String used to represent rope
  • Textured ribbon used to represent wooden poles




THE OLD SCHOOLHOUSE IN COTTOWN, BY JANE SHELDON

The Old Schoolhouse in Cottown is thought to have ben constructed between 1745 and 1770, the rubble plinth possibly being the remains of an earlier sandstone building destroyed by fire in 1766. The Cottown Schoolhouse is constructed out of traditional wattle and daub walls and thatched with reeds from the nearby and extensive reed beds on the River Tay. The Old Schoolhouse is now owned by the National Trust of Scotland.

  • Landscape Quilt of three layers
  • Cotton batik pieces appliquéd onto calico backing
  • Inktense colouring on roof and chimneys
  • Wool couching to represent thatching
  • Free motion machine quilted

FRIARTON BRIDGE, RIVER TAY, BY HILARY KIRK

The panoramic local view along the north stretch of the River Tay shows, with a little artistic licence, Kinnoull Hill and Elcho Castle. This piece of work was created as a contribution to the Tay Landscape and Piece Partners point project and was based on a painting of the area by my husband.

  • Landscape quilt with machine appliqué
  • Fabric stabilised with Bondaweb
  • Fly tying silver thread used in the river




THE SILVERY TAY, BY JEAN BEATTIE

Inspired by (a misquote of) the poem by the 19th Century poet William McGonnagall:

The Tay, the Tay, the silvery Tay, it flows from Perth to Dundee each day.

My favourite view of the river is from the Kinnoull Hill tower, looking east towards Dundee.

  • A fabric collage created from a photograph
  • Bonderwebbed to a background
  • Raw edge appliquéd by machine
  • Machine and hand quilted




VIEW OF KINNOULL HILL AND THE RIVER TAY, BY LESLEY MCCLINTOCK

This is one of my favourite views of the River Tay. Hand appliquéd and quilted 

THE TOWER, KINNOULL HILL, “THE TOP OF THE WORLD”, BY SHONA BURTON

The inspiration for this Landscape was childhood memories of looking down at the Carse of Gowrie from the tower on Kinnoull Hill. I used to think it was the top of the world!

I used brusho paints in crystal form, by spraying them with water the colour spreads out. I also machine quilted- free motion style.

This Landscape quilt is a representation of the tower on Kinnoull Hill and the Carse of Gowrie.


KINNOULL HILL, BY DOROTHY EWEN

On an outcrop a few hundred yards to the east of the summit of Kinnoull Hill is Kinnoull Tower, built in 1829 by Lord Grey of Kinfauns. Grey saw a great similarity between the River Tay and parts of the Rhine. Inspired by the castle on the Rhine, he built the tower asa romantic folly and also used it as an observatory.

The part to the tower is close to the edge of a high and dangerous cliff, though this is partly hidden by the trees. There are occasional gaps which allow dramatic views down to the Tay and the A90 far below, with the Lomond Hills and Fife beyond.

  • Tower centre is foundation pierced with embroidery and random quilting
  • Branches are strands of wool couched on the sky
  • Felt is used to represent the tree, shrub and lichen on the walls of the tower






ABERNETHY STONE, BY LORNA SCOTT


.















COBBLE BOAT FERRY, BY LESLEY MCCLINTOCK

The cobble boat ferry was used on the River Tay at Jamesfield and at Cairnie Pier.

My interpretation of the cobble boat ferry was machine pierced and hand quilted.







APPLES AND PEARS, BY LESLEY MCCLINTOCK
Foundation pieced then hand appliquéd and hand quilted.





A TASTE OF THE TAY, BY JANE SHELDON

.






吀愀欀 唀瀀 夀攀爀 一攀攀搀氀攀猀 䌀栀爀椀猀琀椀渀攀
(㈀ ㄀㜀ⴀ㄀㄀ⴀ㌀  ㄀㘀㌀ )
-0:47

,





TAY HERON1
0:00/0:17

Patient and proud on the bank of the Tay

Balanced on long legs, fishing all day

Doesn’t care whether it’s fine or bad weather

When the wind blows it just ruffles his feathers


LADE S0NG
0:00/1:44



Seven hundred years ago

At Huntingtower the dig began

Frae Almond River tae the Tay

Four miles long the channel ran


They made that water work so hard

To turn the wheels that made Perth's power

Now it murmurs peacefully

Aa the way frae Huntingtower


The work an trade o man an Maid

Aa relied on Perth Town Lade

NEDERLANDER POLDERMAN 1
0:00/0:14
倀漀氀搀攀爀洀愀渀 䌀栀爀椀猀琀椀渀攀
(㈀ ㄀㜀ⴀ㄀㄀ⴀ㌀  ㄀㘀㌀ )
-0:19

Netherlander polderman, build your dyke high

Bend your back, chase the water

Netherlander polderman, making schoon flats

Shape the land and shape the river

The tune is a Dutch kid's song about ducks swimming in the water, polderman is dyke builder, schoon flats are beautiful flat lands.


一攀瘀攀爀 嘀攀爀礀 䘀愀爀 䄀眀愀礀
(㈀ ㄀㜀ⴀ 㜀ⴀ㈀  ㄀ ㄀㘀)
-2:32



Cottown School got flooded too, roll on

Not just once, quite a few, roll on

Clay for the walls, thatch for the roof

That won't make it waterproof, roll on

Oh, the River Tay, never very far away, roll on




圀栀攀爀攀 䄀爀攀 吀栀攀 䈀漀愀琀猀
(㈀ ㄀㜀ⴀ 㜀ⴀ㈀  ㄀ ㄀㘀)
-3:26

Inchyra wis known as the Loaf Ferry, MacDuff he wis runnin fur safety

He hadny the money, he paid wi some breid, and afterwards other folk paid the same way

Lindores tae Errol, Port Allan tae Newburgh, Ferryfield ower tae Cairnie

Carpow tae Inchyra, Kinfauns tae East Rhynd, far more direct than the motorways


一攀瘀攀爀 嘀攀爀礀 䘀愀爀 䄀眀愀礀
(㈀ ㄀㜀ⴀ 㜀ⴀ㈀  ㄀ ㄀㘀)
-2:32

The River starts in the Cairngorm hills, roll on

Runs down Ben Lui as a little rill, roll on

One hundred and twenty miles, no less

Through the land to east from west, roll on

Oh, the River Tay, never very far away, roll on








Tib Smith went sailing with her Uncle Tim, her Uncle Tim, her Uncle Tim

Out in a row boat they pulled on the oars, out on the River Tay

The boat had a windlass to pull on the net, pull on the net, pull on the net

The boat had a windlass to pull on the net, out on the River Tay


一攀瘀攀爀 嘀攀爀礀 䘀愀爀 䄀眀愀礀
(㈀ ㄀㜀ⴀ 㜀ⴀ㈀  ㄀ ㄀㘀)
-2:32

Elizabeth woke one morning bright, roll on

The floor it was a shiny sight, roll on

She stepped in water up to her knees

All Inchyra were not pleased, roll on

Oh, the River Tay, never very far away, roll on






The bothy lads had cobles, pullin hard on the oars

Newburgh sprat yawls had sails an nets an booms

Catchin sprats and spurlins, but they wid catch the salmon too

Till they got caught and confiscated, served them right said Dave

Salmon fishin on the Tay, those were the grand days

Plenty salmon in the Tay, but noo they've gone away




吀漀眀攀爀 刀愀瀀 ㈀ 攀搀椀琀攀搀
(㈀ ㄀㜀ⴀ㄀ ⴀ 㘀 ㄀㌀㔀㈀)
-0:56

Up the road from Abernethy School there’s a tower. Tall and pointy.

At the top there’s a golden fish and it shows which way the wind blows.

Go to the museum and get the key. It's 25 centimetres.

Unlock the door and climb the steps and see the muckle great bell.

Up the ladder to the heavy trap door. Its pitch black, dark and scary.

You can see the silvery Tay and the Castlelaw hill behind you

(The Stone is at the base of the tower)


圀栀攀爀攀 䄀爀攀 吀栀攀 䈀漀愀琀猀
(㈀ ㄀㜀ⴀ 㜀ⴀ㈀  ㄀ ㄀㘀)
-3:26

Where are the boats that would carry us safe, ferry us ower the Firth o Tay

A steamship, a paddle boat, anything that'll float, just like they did in the auld days

Lindores tae Errol, Port Allan tae Newburgh, Ferryfield ower tae Cairnie

Carpow tae Inchyra, Kinfauns tae East Rhynd, far more direct than the motorways


APPLE AND PEAR1
0:00/0:19



I gave my love an apple

I gave my love a pear

I gave my love a mwaah mwaah mwaah

And kicked him doon the stair


I kicked him over Italy

I kicked him over France

I kicked him over the USA

And he lost his underpants

EVER THE MOUNTAINS 1
0:00/0:24


And ever the mountains, and ever the mountains

And ever the mountains stand high

Cutting the clouds, piecing the sky

 

And ever the mountains, and ever the mountains

And ever the mountains stand proud

Piecing the sky, cutting the clouds